Royal Canadian Navy Drinks
&                    
Naval Toasts          
of the Day             


Naval Rum Terminology

  • Grog: Traditionally, 2 parts water, 1 part Pusser's rum
  • Tot: 1/8 pint rum, the standard daily ration
  • Neat: Rum without water
  • Splice the Main Brace: A doube tot for a job well done
  • The Framework of Hospitality: Where 3 sippers equal 1 gulp, 3 gulps equal 1 tot
  • Gulpers: One, but only one, big swallow from another's tot
  • Sandy Bottoms: To see off whatever's in a mug when offered by a friend
  • Bob's-a-Dying: In Admiral Nelson's day, it meant a "stupendous drunken bash"

Drink Measures

  • 1 dash = 8 to 10 drops
  • 1 tablespoon = 3 teaspoons
  • 1 jigger = 1 1/2 ounces
  • 1 'tot' = 2 imperial ounces or 2 1/2 US ounces
  • 6 dashes = 1 teaspoonful
  • 2 tablespoons = 1 fluid ounce or 1 pony
  • 1 large jigger = 2 ounces
  • 1 cup = 8 ounces or 1/2 pint

18th Century Royal Navy Drinks

Flip
A favorite below decks during the 1800s -- especially while in port where plenty of fresh beer was available.
  • 1 ounces Pusser's
  • 1 pint cold beer or ale
    Pour into tall glass or mug, the rum first, and do not stir

    Bombo
    This was a favorite when the men were ashore in the West Indies. It later became popular as an afternoon drink on the southern plantations in the United States.
  • Tall glass filled with ice cubes
  • 2 ounces Pusser's
  • 1/2 ounce sugar syrup
    Fill the glass with water, stir, and garnish with an orange slice and cherry. Sprinkle nutmeg and cinnamon on top.

    Navy Punch
    This was a drink for the officers and those who came from the quarterdeck. It was popular at dinner parties and balls.
  • Shaker filled with ice cubes
  • 1 ounce lime juice
  • 2 ounces liquid sugar
  • 3 ounces Pusser's
    Shake well, and pour into tall glass or large old fashioned glass partly filled with ice. Garnish with fruit and sprinkle nutmeg on top.

    Hot Toddy
    This was often issued under conditions of cold and fatigue when rounding Cape Horn -- or "old Cape Stiff" as it was often called during the many years before the Panama Canal.
  • 2 ounces Pusser's
  • 1 tablespoon brown sugar
    Place ingredients in a heavy earthenware mug, pour in hot water, and top off with nutmeg and stick of cinnamon.

    Grog
    Booze 'n water.
  • Old fashioned glass
  • 1 tot Pusser's
  • 2 tots good water
    Squeeze a wedge of fresh lime and stir. Float the expended lime on top.

  • Modern Pusser's Drinks

           
    Tortola Orangeade
    For those who miss breakfast on a hot day.
  • Tall glass filled with ice cubes
  • 2 ounces Pusser's
  • Fill glass with orange juice
  • Juice from lime wedge to taste.
    Stir and garnish with cherry and orange slice

    Modern Navy Grog
    This drink isn't anything like the old grog, but it is tasteful and refreshing.
  • Blender with 1 cup cracked ice
  • 3 ounces Pusser's
  • 1 ounce lime juice
  • 1 ounce orange juice
  • 1 ounce pineapple juice
  • 1 ounce passion fruit nectar
  • 1/2 ounce Falernum
    Blend briefly and pour into old fashioned glass with a few ice cubes. Garnish with fruit and serve with a straw.

    P&P
    'P&P' or Pusser's and Pepsi, a more modern version of 'Rum and Coke' which was the most popular drink of World War II.
  • Tall glass filled with ice cubes
  • 2 to 3 ounces Pusser's
  • Pepsi Cola
  • Fresh juice from a lince wedge.
    Stir, and float the expended wedge on top.

    Pusser's & Tonic
    Classic.
  • Fill tall glass with ice cubes
  • 1 1/2 ounces Pusser's
  • Tonic water
    Squeeze in a slice of lime, and stir gently.

    Pina Colada
    Great for lazy summer days. Stick an umbrella in the drink for added ambiance.
  • 1 to 1 1/2 cups shaved or cracked ice
  • 2 ounce Pusser's
  • 3 ounces unsweetened pineapple juice
  • 2 ounces cream of coconut
  • 1/2 ounce Cointreau
    Combine in a blender and blend briefly. Pour into a large cocktail glass and serve with a straw. Garnish with a cherry.

    Planter's Punch
  • Shaker with 1 cup cracked ice
  • 3 ounces Pusser's
  • 1 ounce lime juice
  • 1 ounce sugar syrup
  • 3 to 5 dashes Angustora bitters
  • soda water
    Shake well and pour unstrained into tall glass with several ice cubes. Top off with soda water, stir, and garnish with lime slice. Serve with a straw.

    Royal Navy Fog Cutter
  • Shaker filled with ice cubes
  • 2 ounces Pusser's
  • 1/2 ounce gin
  • 2 ounces lemon juice
  • 1 ounce orange juice
  • 1/2 ounce orgeat syrup
    Shake well, and strain into a tall glass filled with ice cubes. Float 1 teaspoon dry sherry on top, garnish, and serve with a straw.

    Bloody Pusser's
  • Tall glass filled with ice cubes
  • 1 1/2 ounce Pusser's
  • 1 ounce lime juice
  • tomato juice to fill
  • 1 or 2 dashes Worcestershire sauce
  • 1 dash Tabasco sauce
    Sprinkle "Tortola Salt" (pepper and spices) to taste, then stir and garnish with a slice of lime

    The Big Dipper
    Popular on Atlantic crossings just before star time.
  • Shaker filled with ice cubes
  • 1 ounce Pusser's
  • 1 ounce brandy
  • 1 tablespoon lime juice
  • 1/2 teaspoon sugar
  • dash of Cointreau
    Shake well, strain into an old fashioned glass with several ice cubes, fill with club soda, and stir slightly.

    Pusser's Teatotaler
  • Tall glass filled with ice cubes
  • 2 ounces Pusser's
  • 3 level teaspoons iced tea mix
    Fill glasses with water, stir, and garnish with slice of lime or lemon.

    Force 12
    The test for good sea legs.
  • Shaker filled with ice cubes
  • 2 ounces Pusser's
  • 1 ounce vodka
  • 1/2 ounce grenadine
  • 2 ounces pineapple juice
    Shake well and pour into tall glasses. Garnish with fruit slices.

    Tortola Cooler
    This drink started on Main Street in Road Town, Tortola, a sailor's delight.
  • Tall glass filled with ice cubes
  • 1 1/2 ounces Pusser's
  • 4 ounces orange juice
  • Top off with 7-Up
  • 1 teaspoon fresh lime juice
    Stir and garnish with an orange wedge and cherry.

    The Deep Six
    This is an unusual drink: smooth, flavorful, expensive and powerful.
  • Tall glass filled with crushed ice
  • 2 ounces Pusser's
  • 1 tablespoon lime juice
  • 1/2 ounce sugar syrup
  • champagne
    Combine the rum, lime juice and sugar, and stir well. Then fill the glass with champagne and stir gently. Garnish with a slice of lime.

    Pusser's Daiquiri
    More flavor than the standard Daiquiri.
  • Shaker filled with ice cubes
  • 1 1/2 ounces Pusser's
  • 1/2 ounce lime juice
  • 1/2 ounce sugar syrup
    Shake well and strain into chilld cocktail glass.

    Limey
    Time for a history lesson here: why the British are called "limeys." Admiral Vernon's order which created "grog" read in part, "and lines to make [the rum] more palatable to them [when mixed with water]." And so it was that grog mixed with lime juice came to be known as a "Limey," and the British ships as "Limejuicers." This is the modern version of the limey; it uses soda water instead of normal water, an improvement in my mind.
    • Tall glass filled with ice cubes
    • 2 ounces Pusser's
    • Top off with soda water
    • Squeeze the juice from one-half lime
      Sugar to taste if desired, but it is not traditional. Stir, and float the expended one-half lime on top.



  • Naval Toasts of the Day

    In the navy there is a toast for each day of the week. Normally these toasts are used at special
    occasions and mess dinners, but they may be used at any time.
    Most recently the toasts were changed to better reflect the current "Navy".

    Toasts of the Day (the original ones)

    Sunday: Absent friends and those at sea; absent friends.
    Monday: Our native land; Queen and country.
    Tuesday: Our mothers; health and wealth.
    Wednesday: Ourselves; our swords; old ships (i.e., shipmates).
    Thursday: The King; honest men and bonnie lassies.
    Friday: Fox hunting and old port; ships at sea.
    Saturday: Sweethearts and wives.


    Toasts of the Day ( before the "Politically Correct" days)

    Sunday: Absent friends.
    Monday: Our ships at sea.
    Tuesday: Our men.
    Wednesday: Ourselves
       (the remark "since no one else is likely to think of us" often follows the toast but is not actually part of it).
    Thursday: A bloody war or a sickly season.
    Friday: A willing foe and sea room.
    Saturday: Sweethearts and wives ("may they never meet" is a popular response to this toast).

     

    Toasts of the Day ( the current "Politically Correct" Toasts.)

    Sunday:  Absent friends.
    Monday:  Our ships.
    Tuesday: Our sailors.
    Wednesday: Ourselves
    Thursday: Our Navy.
    Friday: Our Nation.
    Saturday: Absent Friends.